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If you’re a science-news junkie, odds are that you already know about ScienceDaily and check in frequently. New restrictions on US seafood imports, which will require seafood to be harvested in accordance with the US Marine Mammal Protection Act, will likely offer significant marine conservation benefits on a global scale. A genetic change in the protein eEF2K creates resistance to epileptic attacks, thereby creating the possibility of a new treatment for the disease, show the surprising results of a new study. Brain connections that play a key role in complex thinking skills show the poorest health with advancing age, new research suggests. Today, to take a break after our quiz, we watched a video: Bill Nye the Science Guy – Earth’s Seasons.science daily

To ensure the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) is responsive to changing environmental conditions like climate change and sea-level rise, as well as to changes in water management, a new report calls for a re-examination of the program’s original restoration goals and recommends a forward-looking, systemwide analysis of Everglades restoration outcomes across a range of scenarios.

ScienceDaily features breaking news and videos about the latest discoveries in science, health, the environment, technology, and more – from major news services and leading universities, scientific journals, and research organizations. The collaborators’ case report reflects the potential of precision medicine – applying basic science knowledge to individualize treatment to a patient’s unique genetic profile. Also contains vitamines E, C, B3, B5, and B6. All great for your skin health and elasticity.

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In a population-based Canadian study of children with epilepsy, each of whom had access to universal health care, those from poor families had the same medical course and remission rate as their wealthier counterparts, but they had a less favorable social outcome as adults.